Collegiate High School

Collegiate High School

Click on this link for more information and a link will be located at the bottom if you wish to get an application. http://www.pasco.k12.fl.us/otl/chs

The application window for the 2018-2019 PHSC Collegiate High School Program will be December 4th – February 2nd.

The Collegiate High School Program:

  • is designed to allow students to earn an AA/AS Degree or a Cape Certification while also earning their Standard High School Diploma; 
  • provides students priority when enrolling in PHSC courses by allowing them to register at the same time as all other fee-paying PHSC students;  
  • requires students to be full-time at PHSC and accepted students will not take any courses on the high school campus;
  • allows accepted students to still be considered a student of their zoned high school and students are able to participate in their zoned school athletics, student activities, and graduation ceremonies.

 

To qualify students must:

  • be in 11th or 12th grade during the 18-19 school year*;
  • have a cumulative unweighted 3.0 GPA;
  • have college-ready PERT scores Reading (106), Writing (103) and Math (123)**; 
  • provide their own transportation;
  • be willing to take all of their courses at a PHSC Campus.

Current sophomores must also be on track to earn credit in the following coursework by the end of the 2017-2018 school year:

  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Algebra 1
  • 1 credit in Geometry
  • 1 credit in Biology 1
  • 1 credit of an equally rigorous Science
  • 1 credit in World History
  • 1 credit in P.E.
  • 1 credit in Fine Arts
  • 2 credits in Foreign Language (desired)
  • 1 credit in a subject area or elective (3 credits total if there is no Foreign Language)

Current juniors must also be on track to earn credit in the following coursework by the end of the 2017-2018 school year:

  • 3 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Algebra 1
  • 1 credit in Geometry
  • 1 credit in another Math
  • 1 credit in Biology 1
  • 1 credit (or more) of an equally rigorous Science
  • 1 credit in World History
  • 1 credit in US History
  • 1 credit in P.E.
  • 1 credit in Fine Arts
  • 2 credits in Foreign Language (desired)
  • 4 credits in a subject area or electives (6 credits total if there is no Foreign Language)

*Students who do not participate in the Collegiate High School program for both their Junior and Senior years may not meet all requirements to earn an AA or AS degree. 

**If a student has already taken Intermediate Algebra through Dual Enrollment a score of 114 will meet requirements.

The Application Process:

  • Check this website or with your school counselor beginning on December 4th to access the application.
  • Complete the application and submit it to your school counselor no later than February 2nd.
  • The application process occurs once a year and students enter the program at the start of the Fall Term only.
  • Current juniors in the CHS program do NOT need to reapply for their senior year.
  • There are 60 available seats for the CHS program and those seats will be filled through a lottery process.
  • Students who leave the Collegiate High School program to return to their high school are not eligible to reapply to the program.
  • Those students who do not maintain a high school overall cumulative unweighted 3.0 GPA and a 2.0 cumulative GPA in all PHSC courses will not be allowed to continue participating in the PHSC Collegiate High School Program.
  • Students must meet the stated prerequisite(s) and/or co-requisite(s) for each course in the PHSC Collegiate High School Program.
  • All Collegiate High School students must agree to abide by all PHSC policies and procedures. By applying the student understands that if they violate any items in the PHSC Code of Student Conduct, they may be denied participation in the Collegiate High School Program.
Support The Cobra Wrestlers!

Support The Cobra Wrestlers!

The Cobra Wrestling Team is selling sweatshirts, long sleeve shirts, and short sleeve shirts to help raise funds for their upcoming season. If you have any questions, see Coach Burgos! 

HUDSON “ON TRACK” COBRAS

HUDSON “ON TRACK” COBRAS

Frequently Asked Questions: 

Where are on track students allowed to eat?

  • All students are allowed to eat in the cafeteria or on the patio. On track, students are also able to eat in the commons area, and they may also eat in teachers’ classrooms with a pass from the teacher.

 

      Where are off track students allowed to eat?

  • All students are allowed to eat in the cafeteria or on the patio. Off track, students may also go to a teachers’ classroom to complete assignments, makeup work, or for tutoring during lunch with a pass from the teacher.

 

      Are there any exceptions to the absences requirement?

  • Students should have no more than 4 excused or unexcused absences in any one class per quarter (a total of 16 absences per year). Absences excused with doctors’ notes and school-related absences such as field trips, competitions, etc.… will not be counted towards off track/on track. *Please note, that per Pasco County School’s student code of conduct, written documentation from parents/guardians must be provided within 3 days of the absence- otherwise the absence will remain unexcused.

 

     What happens if a student loses his or her band or ID?

  • Bands will not be replaced until the following quarter, but students may show their ID to verify that they are on track. Lost IDs must be reported to administration and a temporary card will be issued until new IDs are ordered (fees may apply). IDs will only be replaced once per school year.

 

What other incentives are there for being on track?

  • The best incentive for being on track is graduating with your high school diploma, the reason we are all here! 
  • Free admission to select athletic games/events at Hudson High.
  • Surprise treats and events throughout the year
  • Have ideas/suggestions for other incentives? Let us know!
Doggie Day Spa

Doggie Day Spa

http://www.tampabay.com/news/education/k12/Spa-and-day-care-for-dogs-give-Hudson-High-students-a-leg-up-on-veterinary-care_162369013

 

HUDSON — Hudson High School goes to the dogs every Friday. And the staff and students alike seem to love the experience.

Hudson High’s Academy of Veterinary Assisting hosts the Doggie Spa and Doggie Day Care from 7:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. each Friday. The spa and day care center includes grooming tables, a bathing area, and a kennel area.

During that time, it’s not unusual to see dogs of every breed being groomed, cleaned, walked and cared for in the school’s vet assisting lab — -and, on occasion, even trying to drink from the classroom drinking fountain.

You also see student volunteers learning the finer points of veterinary care.

“The kids do a great job,” said Robert Herrington, a Hudson High teacher and head of the veterinary program. “They’re learning the introductory skills they need to work in a veterinarian’s office.”

The students can, in fact, earn their certified veterinary assistant certificate at the academy. And at the doggie day spa and daycare, they apply the skills they’ve learned to the care of pet patrons, including a good number of regulars.

There’s Cinderella, a Great Dane. Pig, a pit bull/Chihuahua mix. Yeti, a Labrador-shepherd. And Labradors Sheldon and Penny.

Many of the canine customers belong to students and staff members. The service is also open to the public, with donations collected going toward a new grooming table and lab equipment.

“Our goal is to have a self-sufficient veterinary academy,” said Herrington. “We want to sustain ourselves.”

His students have their own goals. Inspired by her involvement with the dog spa and the veterinary academy in general, senior Zoie Brayman has started her own pet grooming service.

“I do want to be a veterinarian,” said Brayman, 16, the youngest student in the program to receive her CVA. “I’m interested in entrepreneurship. I want to get into it.”

Ella Shiver, 15, said she has learned a variety of veterinary skills through her involvement in the doggie spa and veterinary academy — skills that include grooming, nail trimming, bathing, ear cleaning and calming.

“I love playing with the animals and being around them,” the 10th-grader said. “And by working here, I can show people that I’m capable.”

Amy Kurzinger, 16, also has earned her CVA through the program and wants to become an Army veterinarian.

“In this program, you can learn anything you need to know to take care of animals,” Kurzinger Amy. “And I bond with each dog.”By Megan Hussey, Times Correspondent